Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Caffè, coffee, café, kaffee, кофеий

It has many names, it is known in every part of the world and wherever you travel it is the universally recognized language for “welcome, sit, be comfortable and let's get acquainted”.

On the Ethiopia farm – Kochere CooperativeThe coffee plant likely first appeared on the high plateaus of central Ethiopia and over the centuries made its way to Yemen where it has been cultivated since the 6th century. Upon introduction of the first coffee houses in Cairo and Mecca coffee became a passion, a stimulant and a vital commodity influencing both economic power and the destinies of nations.

By earliest accounts coffee came to the new world with the first Jamestown colonists under Captain John Smith in 1607. The first coffee houses opened in England by the mid 1600s and in 1668 Edward Lloyd opened his coffeehouse in London, known as Lloyd’s of London; it is frequented by maritime merchants who contrive to offset their risk of shipping disasters at sea by selling shares in the success of their shipments. The insurance industry is born and Lloyd’s of London is today arguably the best known insurer in the world.

video

Coffee in the United States is the common denominator of on-the-go refreshment and quiet relaxation. Whether grabbing a latte at Starbucks on your way to the office or lingering over a decaf before bedtime coffee represents no class distinction or economic hierarchy; it’s everybody’s beverage and everyone likes it their way.

Here then are a few coffee faves, if yours isn’t on this short list send it to us at Rick's Place and we'll tell the world how you like your coffee.

Here’s cooking at you, kid, Rick

    Caffè Latte

    Caffè Latte is the Italian variant of coffee with milk. A good Caffè Latte is always an espresso. Hot milk is poured onto the espresso. The result is crowned by a little milk foam. Caffè Latte is served in a tall glass bigger than the Cappuccino cup.

    Ingredients:
      3/4 C milk coffee beans (grind fine powder)
      sugar (to taste)

    Macchiato

    Macchiato, meaning something like “spotted”, is an Espresso with a dash of foamed milk. At first sight it resembles a small Cappuccino but even if the ingredients are the same as those used for Cappuccino, a Macchiato has a much stronger and aromatic taste.

    Ingredients:
      1/2 C milk coffee beans (grind fine powder)
      sugar and/or cocoa powder (depending on your taste)

    Cappuccino

    A classical Italian recipe. It consists of 1/3 espresso, hot milk and milk foam to crown the cup. A little cocoa powder is sprinkled on the Cappuccino.

    Ingredients:
      1/2 C milk coffee beans (grind fine powder)
      cocoa powder sugar (to taste)

    Espresso

    The absolute classic from Italy. To prepare correctly, the hot water is forced through the ground coffee portion for 25 seconds. The espresso is rounded off with a dash of firm cream.

    Ingredients:
      coffee beans (grind fine powder)
      sugar (to taste)

    Lungo

    Lungo is a longer espresso. The same amount of ground coffee powder is used as for an espresso, but more water is forced through.

    Ingredients:
      coffee beans (grind fine powder)
      sugar (to taste)

    Ristretto

    Nothing could be shorter! The further south you go the less water is used in preparation. A Ristretto is prepared with about half as much water as an espresso using the same quantity of ground coffee. This gives the Ristretto its aromatic taste.

    Ingredients:
      coffee beans (grind medium powder)
      sugar (to taste)

    Coffee Crème

    The classic from Switzerland. The “Schümli“, as it is known in popular parlance because of its light cream colour, is prepared with far more water than an espresso. Coffee Crème tastes better with a light coffee roast.

    Ingredients:
      coffee beans (grind coarse powder)
      sugar (to taste) coffee cream (to taste)


Ripe coffee cherries – on the farm in IndiaThanks to the fine folks at Portland Roasting Company for the slide show and photographs as well as their own recommendations for these 3 great shops in the Portland area, which serve an excellent cup of Portland Roasting Coffee:

    Twin paradox
    8609 SE 17th Avenue
    Portland, OR 97202
    503.232.8202

    Cooper’s Coffee
    6049 Se Stark St
    Portland, OR 97215
    (503) 238-2120

    J Café
    533 NE Holladay St
    Portland, OR 97232
    (503) 230-9599

Through their Farm Friendly Direct™ program, Portland Roasting strives to make a positive influence on the world of coffee by embracing “Fair Trade” practices.

Please visit them on line at www.portlandroasting.com to learn more about community involvement and the world of sustainable coffee cultivation.

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